• Getting the green light

    • 2011-04-19
    • WENDY BROFFMAN

    In January, NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe told attendees at NAHB Builder's show in Orlando, Fla., that he expects 2011's selling season for single-family homes to beat out 2010, with job growth providing an even better stimulus than last year's homebuyer tax credits. Some market experts expect to see a few condo conversions later this year.

    Ev


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  • All about the "O"

    • 2011-04-19
    • PEGGY SHAW

    At the beginning of the year, UDR CEO Tom Toomey predicted good things for the apartment industry. "We support the consensus view that the macro trends for our industry are some of the best many of us will see in our careers," he said in February. "I think we will have the wind at our backs for 2011, 2012 and beyond," he predicted.

    Job growth, th


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  • Bring the best of America into your business

    • 2011-04-19
    • JERRY FELDMAN

    This staggering rate of attrition costs employers a great deal of money, and makes it a constant challenge to find qualified, reliable people to hire for leasing positions such as managers, maintenance techs and leasing consultants.

    What if you could hire from a pool of individuals with a known track record for being punctual, hardworking and loy


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  • Change in the air

    • 2011-04-19
    • WENDY BROFFMAN

    What is yet unclear is what will replace them.

    The GSEs are blamed in large part for the single-family finance bubble that led to the current economic downturn, and the country's leaders believe GSE reform is necessary to prevent another meltdown. The purpose of GSE reform is to end the taxpayer-funded bailout and shift the burden of loss to the


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  • How to garner the right kind of attention

    • 2011-04-19
    • Sherrie Bourg Carter, PhD, Harvard Business Review

    No matter how talented or accomplished you are, you cannot always count on attracting and retaining the attention of others. Too many options compete for everyone's attention, and they multiply with each passing day. It will be more and more challenging to rise above the noise and hold onto the attention of those who matter to you.

    Attention prov


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  • HUD gets a haircut

    • 2011-04-19
    • WENDY BROFFMAN

    In line with President Barack Obama's directive to cut the deficit by $400 billion over the next decade, HUD's budget creates no new programs and proposes additional funding only for programs that assist the most needy Americans.

    Bolstering those programs led HUD to make the tough decisions to cut other programs like Community Development Block G


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  • In a twist

    • 2011-04-19
    • Christine Gorman, writer and editor for Scientific American

    The survey of nearly 1,000 adults found that 77 percent of Americans are stressed about work. What are workers stressed about?
    - 14 percent cite low pay
    - 11 percent, commuting
    - 9 percent, an unreasonable workload
    - 9 percent, fear of being laid off
    - 8 percent, annoying co-workers
    - 5 percent, an annoying boss
    - 5 percent, po


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  • Is criticism more effective than praise?

    • 2011-04-19
    • Linda Hill & Kent Lineback

    If you do, you're only human. Paying more attention to what's wrong isn't wrongheaded or perverse. In fact, you could say you do it because, in your experience, criticism produces better results than praise. Criticism is more often followed by improved performance; and praise is often followed by performance that's not as good. Hence, you think, pr


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  • MHP Reflections

    • 2011-04-19
    • Linda Hoffman, Publisher

    I love a good story. In fact, this issue is full of them. The problem with a good story is that, when it etches itself so deeply in your psyche, it sometimes becomes intertwined with who you are.

    You know, like, "I'm a Mac," or "I'm a PC."

    That's called tribalism.

    Back in the day, the unity of the tribe, in its purist form, was based on kinsh


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  • Where strong foundations prevail

    • 2011-04-19
    • LISA BENSON

    "It's true. In the ghetto, only the strong survive- and I don't mean just physical strength," West said. "I mean strength found in family, religion, friendship, quick wit, love and hard work."

    Founded in 1866, the Fifth Ward became one of six political-geographic areas that make up the city of Houston. By the mid-1880s, it was virtually all Afric


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  • What is a QR code and why do you need one?

    • 2011-04-19
    • Mark Sprague

    What are QR codes?
    They come to us from Japan where they are very common. QR is short for Quick Response; they can be read quickly by a cell phone. They are used to take a piece of information from a transitory media and put it in to your cell phone. You will soon see QR Codes in magazine advertisements, on a billboards, a Web page or even on s


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  • The power of 2

    • 2011-04-19
    • Maxwell Drever, Crossbeam Holdings Chairman Emeritus & Rich Devaney, Crossbeam Holdings Chairman and CEO

    "In partnering on seven deals last year with Rich Devaney and the Crossbeam team, I realized a merger could give us the financial leverage and additional acquisition talent to move quicker in identifying and closing on multifamily properties that are a fit for our signature redevelopment strategy," Concierge CEO Maxwell Drever said when the allianc


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  • The problem with financial bonuses

    • 2011-04-19
    • Adam Grant and Jitendra Singh

    Enron. Tyco. WorldCom. The financial crisis. As corporate scandals and ethical fiascoes shatter the American economy, it is time to take a step back and reflect. What do these disasters have in common? We believe that excessive reliance on financial incentives is a key culprit.

    Starting in the mid to late 1970s and 1980s, the view emerged in mana


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  • The evolution of prejudice

    • 2011-04-19
    • Daisy Grewal, PhD in social psychology from Yale University

    Psychologists have long known that many people are prejudiced toward others based on group affiliations, be they racial, ethnic, religious, or even political. However, we know far less about why people are prone to prejudice in the first place. New research, using monkeys, suggests that the roots lie deep in our evolutionary past.

    Yale graduate s


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  • When bedbugs bite

    • 2011-04-19
    • Andrea Sachs, time.com

    If you find an insect, how do you know it's a bedbug?
    People get bites for months and never see them, because they're very small. Bedbugs go through five stages before they become adults, and in the first three or four stages you will not see them with the naked eye. Now, on top of that, even the ones you can see, they spend 99 percent of their


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  • Group therapy may be a good idea

    • 2011-04-19
    • Jennifer Duell Popovec, globest.com

    But because so many other people do, I hear conversations about these shows all the time. One of them, Hoarders, really caught my attention.

    No, I am not a hoarder (because owning more than 10 pairs of black heels does not make me a hoarder, it makes me fashionable). But US companies are definitely hoarders. That's right Corporate America, I am p


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  • Second-hand smoke and apartments

    • 2011-04-19
    • Excerpt Maria C. Gutierrez, Vista Community Clinic's Tobacco Control Programs

    The report also states that damage from tobacco smoke is immediate, since chemicals in tobacco smoke reach your lungs very quickly every time you inhale. Inhaling even a small amount of tobacco smoke can damage your DNA, and it can lead to serious illness, such as cancer, and ultimately death.

    Infants who are exposed to secondhand smoke are more


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  • Spending on pets up during lean economic times: poll

    • 2011-04-19

    Between trips to the vet, specialty foods, treats and toys, pet insurance and even parties, Americans have no compunction about opening up their wallets to keep Rex, Rover or even the house lizard healthy and happy.

    Flying in the face of economic woes, between two and five percent of pet owners said they spent more on their pets last year, accord


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  • Without influxes of Hispanics and Asians, some U.S. cities would be smaller

    • 2011-04-19
    • Excerpt Carol Morello and Dan Keating, Washington Post

    According to recent census data, Hispanics accounted for the population growth of Philadelphia, Phoenix, Indianapolis, Omaha and Atlanta. Asians boosted the count in Anaheim, Calif.; Fort Wayne, Ind.; Baton Rouge; and Jersey City. Without influx from the two groups, all of those cities would have shrunk.

    Non-Hispanic whites and blacks made a diff


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  • The Closer

    • 2011-04-19
    • David Abromowitz, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, is a founding member of the Lawyers' Clearinghouse on Affordable Housing and Homelessness and of the American Bar Association's Forum Committee on Affordable Housing and Community Development.

    What is the single biggest monthly budget item for most families? A payment for housing, often a rent check.

    Rents are starting to rise dramatically and in every major metropolitan area are expected to rise from 3 percent to 10 percent in 2011 and beyond. That means a family paying $1,700 a month for an average two-bedroom apartment in San Jose m


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